What’s your reaction to this provocation?

Make a comment to tell us what you think of this quote. This comment was made by a participant in a workshop a year ago, but it reflects many similar comments heard over the years.

What do you think?

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4 comments

  1. Gareth Jacobson

    This is a good question Sam, I wonder if a survey would yield a normal distribution curve? In my experience, a minority of teachers couldn’t give a ****; some simply go through the motions, as your image suggests; and some teachers strive through their actions, to make explicit the profile they believe most reflects their identity. However, how many of us think about the profile we find most challenging? Do we work on it?

    I like the idea of the learner profile being made explicit for teachers – what does it mean in practice in our school? Does it guide our interactions with one another? And is it organic, interconnected and visible through the way we as adults run our schools?

    Unfortunately, I am yet to see a clear and simple example of this in practice – it is quite an art to take the complex and make it simple enough for all to take action.

  2. Jabiz Raisdana

    I have been thinking about this a lot lately and will actually write a post about it too.

    I think teachers that work at an IB school should regualry blog about how they are living the profile. More to come…gotta catch a plane.

    • Mr. Sam

      It’s an interesting idea… I’d be interested in setting that up with you. Let us know more of your thoughts when you get back to Jakarta.

  3. Cristina

    Hi Sam,
    The picture is very illustrative of what generally happens in schools. Or at least, in my experience. However, once you get to bring up facts it sounds like complaining/whining/disloyalty towards school staff. It is a delicate issue which, unfortunately, impacts students one way or another, in the long run. 😦
    I am trying to model the profile every single day – through the resources I share, my long hours spent on Twitter or reading blogs – that later result in disseminating information in school, the help I offer whenever is needed. What is odd is that my actions are rarely(if ever) returned…but I keep going. Sharing. Helping.
    I set up a ning, 3 Google Sites for my colleagues, gave them access to everything I work on…but just 2 actually care…
    It all boils down to how passionate teachers are about their profession and how the school leaders encourage a vibrant positive school culture. *sigh*

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