Category: Schools

Lessons from Reggio Emilia #2: Purpose, Clarity and Strength

The second in a series of posts about what we all – regardless of location, curriculum and age level – can learn from the philosophy, practices and people of Reggio Emilia.

There is a powerful certainty that underlies everything the educators in Reggio Emilia do and say. There is an incredible clarity of purpose behind all actions, all words and all decisions. This clarity is unifying, and gives educators strength as they work together to teach in a way that is actually much more difficult than traditional, teach-from-the-box or from-the-planner approaches. This clarity makes it very easy to help new parents understand their approach, their methods, their beliefs about the capacities of children and the parenting styles that are compatible with these beliefs.

The source of this sense of purpose is easily identifiable when the history of the Reggio Emilia approach to education is explained and illustrated to you. It can be traced back to the emergence from the horrors of World War II and the determination of a group of villagers that schooling, for their children and future generations, must have the rights of children at its epicentre. Over the years, this conviction remains just as strong. But, it has also expanded into additional beliefs about the competence of children and the quality of education that they deserve.

There are no grey areas in this, no confusion and certainly no fluffiness.

The schools you and I work in, though, are often prone to such weaknesses – philosophical gaps, indecisiveness and differing practices. We believe we are unified by the fact that we work at, for example, an IB school. Yet, even then, we find ourselves at odds with our colleagues, we even work with colleagues who don’t really believe in what they’re doing, and therefore don’t really do it – whatever it is (something we also struggle to reach a genuine consensus about!). These inconsistencies are sources of weakness – they hold us back in terms of what we are able to do with and for children – but they also make it too easy for parents to pick holes in what we do. We are unable to give parents real explanations because we may not really be sure of what we’re doing, or what we do may differ so much from person to person, from grade level to grade level, from year to year that any explanation may simply be untrue.

Beyond this, though, is the sense that many of our schools lack any kind of genuine ethical stance or purpose beyond teaching some kids of some people who can pay us to teach their kids. This is something that has bothered me for some time as I look around at the world and question the impact of education on society. I think its high time our schools traced back their origins to seek some kind of moral purpose and, if there isn’t one, engage with the whole community to develop one. A real one. Not a collection of fluffy throw-away sentiments in a mission statement. 

Perhaps these questions might help:

  • In what ways are we, and the surrounding community, better because of the existence of our school?
  • What are our shared beliefs about life and what we hope for the future?
  • How much of what happens inside the walls of our school is affected by what happens outside the walls of our school?
  • What do we hope the impact of our school will be in 50 years time?

Set-up. It’s more important than you think.

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Recently, Chad and I ran three days of professional development at United World College Maastricht.

Every session had a different focus: we wanted to provoke different types of thinking; we wanted people to collaborate (or not) differently; we wanted people to experience different emotions and sensations; we wanted people to move (or not) in different ways.

Over the course of three days, we must have changed the physical set-up of the space more than 10 times. We moved, changed, found, borrowed, adapted and replaced furniture, lighting, display boards, music, scents and resources over and over again to try and achieve the desired effect.

This is not something we just do for teachers. It has become a natural part of our pedagogy. If we want students to think, feel or act in a particular way – which we always do – then we take the time to set up for that. We don’t just assume it will happen and then get all disappointed (or, worse still, blame students) when it doesn’t happen.

So:

  • when we want students to focus on one thing, we set up a space in which all other distractions are removed
  • when we want students to be calm, we set up a calm atmosphere with lighting and music
  • when we want students to create, we set up a studio space that promotes creativity
  • when we want students to collaborate, we set up furniture that encourages togetherness
  • when we want students to be able to access materials easily, we set up so that everything is accessible quickly and easily
  • when we want students to…

I could go on… but I think you’re getting the point! The only time we don’t set things up for students is when we want them to set things up for themselves, when that is the focus of the learning. But, come to think of it, that involves some setting up too!

The scary thing about setting up for learning is that there are many educators out there who don’t do it, who don’t see the purpose or the power of it, who don’t take the time to ensure that their students are thinking, feeling or acting in a way that maximises their potential in each learning situation. Then, when their students are fidgety, when their students misbehave, when their students don’t produce what they’re capable of, when their students’ thinking doesn’t go as deep as it could, when their students make thoughtless choices, when their students struggle to find the materials they need, when their students become irritable… they point the finger at their students, not the fact that they didn’t spend 30 minutes setting up.

Think of the classroom, or learning space, as a series of dinner parties. Take the time to create environments and atmospheres according to the purpose.

It works.

 

Evolution Starts Here, Part 2: The Language of Learning

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Nothing irritates me more than teachers saying that educational terminology is “just jargon”. I work in PYP schools, and I hear so-called PYP teachers referring to the language of the PYP as jargon very often. I’ve noticed a pattern – its always the ones who don’t actually know the language, the ones who don’t know what it says in the documents… the ones who are not fluent in the language of learning in their school. Its a type of defense-mechanism, I guess. A front to cover for laziness, or perhaps the fact that they don’t really believe in what they’re doing.

In order to bring about sustainable change, to create the conditions for innovation and to develop a culture in which teachers play with possibilities… everyone in a school needs to be speaking the same language of learning. Once they have that shared language, and they all understand what each other is talking about, there is more room for manoeuvre. Once they are all noticing learning, naming it using the same terminology, they start to see it everywhere… they become liberated from their previously limited views of what learning is, or could be.

This breeds change.

A school needs to actually have a shared language of learning. Then, steps must be taken so that all teachers are fluent in that language. In PYP schools, that language is contained in Making the PYP Happen. Use it! (I’ve written more about this here). In other schools, there are equivalent documents, frameworks, written curriculum, scope and sequences etc… Use them!

Become fluent in the language.

Use the language.

Question the language.

Only then can you really say you know, understand and recognise learning.

Only then can you go deeper into what it all means.

With the fluency comes creativity.

Evolution Starts Here, Part 1: Inquiry-Based Leadership

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It’s funny. There is much talk of inquiry-based learning in schools, but very little of inquiry-based leadership.

Neither is there much of it in practice.

I pondered, for some time, where to begin this series of posts about the evolution of a school in which innovative, even revolutionary, ideas like Studio 5 could become a realistic possibility.

But, looking back, it is clear that the habit of school leaders perpetually asking questions is the very first ingredient in the soup of change.

Why is it like that?

Could it be like this?

What is the purpose of that?

Do we need to do this?

In 2013, the International School of Ho Chi Minh City leadership team – an entirely new group of nine – had no choice other than to ask questions like these. The school was starting a new era, a clean slate… and it was exciting.

These habits of questioning didn’t fizzle out though. We didn’t rest on our laurels, we didn’t allow practices to fossilize or thinking to congeal. Adrian, our Head of School, just would not accept it. “School is broken” he would say “what are we going to do about that?”

This approach permeated everything we did and, Kurtis, the Primary Principal opened up as many aspects of running the school as possible to debate by adopting an inquiry approach to things that, in many schools, are not even remotely that way. Here are a few examples of what this looks like


 

Primary leadership meetings

The intention was that these were always thinking meetings, where issues, challenges or opportunities were put on the table and where input was actively sought, captured and acted upon.

The appraisal process

While still jumping through the hoops of a mandated process, teachers were invited to give their feedback about the direction of the school – things they’d like to see changed, implemented or taken away – and these thoughts were documented and referred back to repeatedly in decision-making.

Coordinator meetings

All too often, these are one-way information delivery meetings dominated by the person with the most authority. Our meetings were, as much as possible, the opposite. All subject and grade level coordinators, in weekly 30-40 minute meetings, were frequently invited to help make decisions about the day-to-day running of the school. Ideas, thoughts and questions were gathered, documented and referred back to repeatedly in decision-making.

The Green Hat Room

It was made explicit that the primary office was a place in which “Green Hat Thinking” (de Bono) was both promoted and expected. Anyone who came in with a problem, a dilemma or an idea was invited to be part of the thinking around it. This goes against the limited view that leadership means “you give me your problem and make it my problem”. People struggled with this, at first, but grew into the intention behind it. The office was always busy with the sound of problem-solving and idea-generation.

Professional trust

Trust is an essential ingredient in inquiry, and inquiry is an essential ingredient in trust. To be able to trust someone, we cannot micromanage them. We must be curious about what they might do, what we might learn from them and how they may shift our thinking. This trust is, of course, not blind – there are always those upon whom trust is bestowed more easily than others. However, the intention was that trust was the default.

Students first

When you deliberately put students, their needs and their learning first, there can be no definitive answers. Education is a behavioural science, not a formula. When it is clear that students are suffering, or not flourishing, questions must be asked of ourselves, our pedagogy, our environments, our culture and our school. It is in asking those questions, and in how we respond to those questions, that school leaders show themselves to be inquirers, or not.

“Let’s try it”

This is a crucial mentality if there is to be any change in education. While it is a good idea to base your practices on established research when possible, sometimes you are the research. This does not mean leaders glibly saying “yeah… go for it” to every idea under the sun. Quite the opposite. It means encouraging disciplined thinking and planning, data collection and reflection, i.e. inquiry.


 

There’s a book in this, as well as many consultancy opportunities, so I’d better stop here or Kurtis will kill me!

Please feel free to share your thoughts about what inquiry-based leadership looks like in your your school context, or what you wish it would look like!

 

 

 

Studio 5: It took more than 7 days

There is considerable hype around the Studio 5 model that is currently being piloted at the International School of Ho Chi Minh City… and rightly so. Studio 5 is a brave concept that doesn’t just pay lip-service to the philosophies upon which the IB Primary Years Programme and other student-centred, inquiry-based frameworks are built. It creates the conditions for all of that philosophy to become practice. Very rare.

Don’t be fooled though.

This stuff is not new.

Progressive and innovative educators have been doing some of these ideas for years. Schools have been designed around them. Movements have evolved around them. Books have been written about them.

But, these have either fizzled out, faded away, disappeared or survived as weird exceptions to the rule. Perhaps sustained by wealthy benefactors, enigmatic leaders or a powerful niche market.

Studio 5 is a wonderful example of what is possible. But it is critical that anyone hoping to move their school, or even just a part of it, towards a similar model must understand that Studio 5 didn’t just appear out of nowhere. It comes after four years of smaller, very significant, steps. Shifting mindsets, pedagogies, structures, systems, habits, priorities… incremental changes to these over a sustained period of time cleared pathways, opened doors and generated momentum.

Each change was a question that could only be answered by the next change.

Without this evolution, one in which the Studio 5 model was genuinely a natural progression, it would just be a novelty.

In a series of upcoming posts, I will reveal the milestones in the evolution of a school in which Studio 5 is possible. Perhaps these can provide tangible ways that other schools can begin to consider similar change, but change that is logical and natural in their context.

 

 

Microcosm for Creating Change

Innovation, Agency, Empowerment are words that should not be used lightly. As professional educators, we believe with absolute conviction, that we can create the change we wish to see. As a School, we wish to challenge the purpose of report cards. Removing report cards would be an unwise and bold move to do all in one swoop. Therefore, we decided to explore this through a microcosm. To gauge whether our thinking, values and philosophy are in-line with being practical and realistic in terms of, if not report cards, then what?

A smaller and measurable scale needed to be the way forward, a pilot.

A microcosm!

In essence the definition of a microcosm is:

A community, place, or situation regarded as encapsulating in miniature the characteristics of something much larger.

We have created a microcosm, a small world where we have brought parents, teachers and students together to pilot a new initiative in PREP from March until June, of this year.

Our own inquiry into: How can we effectively provide meaningful, dynamic and timely feedback that causes thinking and promotes learning and growth together?

We invited parents to Look 4 Learning as an authentic opportunity to see learning in action.

Parents recorded what they heard and saw and then shared their discoveries, questions, concerns and connections. We weren’t telling parents what we do (that’s blind trust) we were showing them what we do everyday and who their child is at school, where they spend most of their day, and young lives.

As a school, we have gone through a grueling process of establishing expectations around report cards and how best to meet the needs of our community as far as a formal document goes. We keep simplifying and seeking ways to satisfy parents in terms of what they know and have experienced in their schooling life.

We explained to parents the ‘input’ (time) vs ‘output’ (impact) aspect of what is involved in the process of writing report cards. They got it. Great! They understood that the time it takes to write report cards, is time taken away from doing all the other things that has a positive impact on learning, without sacrificing the learning conversations, planning, pedagogy, data collection……… Report cards is a static point in time, let’s use dynamic ways (Seesaw) to document learning and provide feedback that encourages and support the learning process.

The idea around what does authentic feedback mean and how feedback should cause thinking become the focus of the conversation. How can we create a solid partnership between parents, teacher and student to develop shared goals where it is valued in the learning process become important too as the discussion evolved.

The power of partnering with parents and teachers led to a deeper understanding of the importance of creating a situation where ‘really’ knowing our students is central to what we hope to achieve everyday. Knowing where they are in their learning and planning for that process of what needs to happen inspires effort and attitudes towards learning which is incredibly motivating for all stakeholders.

Over the next 4 months we are going to put report cards on hold and pilot what we believe to be a more effective and meaningful approach in understanding our students as learners and provide balanced authentic feedback. We have developed six drivers to provide feedback to students and parents that promotes richer and deeper conversations about learning and our learners.

We will review and evaluate the effectiveness of this pilot in June with our parents. Where could this lead? We don’t know and we’re not meant to know just yet. We find that quite liberating and exciting!

Why do we have reports? We have to do and be better. If it is a formality to facilitate the process of a student moving from one school to the next, that’s not good enough. We can work around that. We’re in education! Our parents are with us. They are in with two feet and we’re open to see where this all goes.

We think we have the right balance between being authentic, informative and also ensuring a deep sense of accountability and responsibility in doing these things well.

Where did all this inspiration come from?

From Alan Atkisson and Sam Sherratt. They were the sun providing light and energy in us asking, Why and Who are we?

We accept the challenge to innovate, lead change and transform to impact and ripple out! Out of touch traditions and norms must be challenged and at-least a re-think should occur.

Who are we and who do we want to become?

The Amoeba of Cultural Change should be happening from, and out of, Education. We should be setting the scene for change and leading it. Education has been idle and mainstream for too long. There are some great things happening out there in schools. We need to connect and explore ideas together to reach a tipping point for others to follow, and then lead from the front. Walking the walk, now that is a school I want to be part of. We’re on our way!

Who are you in the Amoeba?

Where do you get your light and energy from to shake education up and try something new?

How do you cultivate change in your school?

 

 

7 Habits of Highly Collaborative Educators

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Although meetings are a context for collaboration, they are not collaboration itself. It is totally possible for collaboration to exist without meetings, and it is also totally possible for meetings to exist without collaboration.

True collaboration becomes part of a school culture when educators are inclined to be collaborative. Not because they have been told to collaborate, but because they can see the value in it for learning.

This inclination to be collaborative involves a number of habits. Here’s my take on what 7 of them might be…

  1. Friendliness – Highly collaborative educators are basically friendly. They enjoy chatting with people, and this opens up a myriad of possibilities to enrich learning. Because they are friendly, other teachers like hanging out with them and this makes it much easier to work together. Pretty simple really.
  2. Being curious – Highly collaborative educators are naturally curious, always asking questions and always interested in what is going around them. This curiosity is infectious and invites other teachers and students to get involved. Curious people are more likely to stick their head into other classrooms, more likely to probe in order to find out what people really mean and more likely to take an interest in what other people think. They are learners and are highly aware of how much there is to learn from their colleagues, students and community.*
  3. Looking and listening for connections – Highly collaborative educators want to be collaborative and are, consciously or subconsciously, alert and actively seeking out connections and relationships with ideas, knowledge, talents, skills, thoughts, places and people. Because of this natural connectivity inclination, highly collaborative people become more receptive to coincidence, serendipity and good fortune that can make learning rich, complex and real.
  4. Continuing the thinking – Highly collaborative educators don’t switch their brains off when they leave the school campus and back on again when they arrive the next day. They’re still thinking late into the night, jotting down notes, sharing ideas on social media, reading blogs, contacting other educators and collaborating with a wide variety of networks. In addition, they generally like to share what they’ve learned with their colleagues over coffee the next day and don’t feel ashamed about “talking shop”!
  5. Putting learning first – Highly collaborative educators automatically generate more work for themselves by putting learning first, they can’t help themselves! When you put learning first, you remain open to all possibilities and are always keen to explore them further to see if they will have an impact on learning, and these possibilities frequently involve collaborating with other people.
  6. Making time – Highly collaborative educators do not allow themselves to use time as an excuse not to collaborate. If there’s an idea they want to share with a colleague, they make the time to talk to them. If someone needs or wants to talk with them, they make time to listen generously. If an idea demands more time to become fully developed, they make the time to work on it. Most importantly, they don’t wait to be told what time they can collaborate, they just do it instinctively.
  7. Making thinking visible – Highly collaborative people invite others to join them by putting their thinking “out there”. They are honest about what they think, they make crazy suggestions, they verbalise possibilities, they expose their vulnerabilities, they take public notes and draw visuals in meetings, they offer to help, they leave their doors open (or remove them), they stick post-its on the wall, they display quotes, they write, they share. Far from being about attention-seeking or self-promotion, these tendencies are all about looking for like minds, allies and the desire to be better educators.

Would you add more to this list?

Thanks to Chye de Ryckel for asking the question that prompted me to write this blog post!

*Thanks to Alison Francis for adding more to the Being curious habit.

Artwork: Totem Pole by Ken Vieth