Tagged: curiosity

Take your situations… and turn them into learning

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We are renovating the outdoor space in our Early Explorers area. Because of a number of practical issues, the work is being done while we are at school.

This is obviously quite a disturbance, and also has an impact on the space that is available to the students for outside play.

This could be very annoying and could be a cause of stress to teachers… and therefore to students too.

However, all situations that come up around us can easily be opportunities to learn – if we allow them to be. We can choose to be unhappy about such things – like bad weather, powercuts, big events, things not working, disturbances, distractions, unforeseen circumstances etc… or we can choose to make them part of the learning. Very often, these opportunities lead to much powerful learning than we could ever have planned for!

This week, our Early Explorers teachers “lifted the curtain” on the construction work that is going on in their playground. Not only were the students fascinated by it, they were also invited to help out! So, suddenly you have a group of four-year-olds rendering a real building, using real tools and real materials. The man supervising the construction was so excited about this that he is going to continue to look for simple, safe ways that the students can be a part of the construction work.”They are the next generation of adults” he said, clearly imagining a whole group of young architects or builders in the next twenty years!

Naturally, the experience has provoked all sorts of play, art and questions in the Early Explorers classrooms… and teachers are planning many ways to take them further.

So, next time there’s a thunderstorm… open the windows and see how your students react. Next time something breaks your routine or disrupts your usual plans… run with it. See what effect it has on the learning… a different type of learning than the one you had in mind! As you become more comfortable with this, perhaps… in the future… you might start actively seeking these opportunities.

Oh… and p.s… this doesn’t only apply to early years teachers.

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What has become normal… and shouldn’t be?

  • What has become normal in schools?
  • What has become normal in life?
  • How much of what is normal is acceptable?
  • How much of what is normal is harmful or destructive?
  • How much do we perpetuate the normal in schools?
  • How do we challenge the normal in schools?
  • How do we encourage our students to challenge the normal?

BIG questions. But, if we are not answering them in the world of education then where and when will they be answered? Can we afford not to answer them?

Thanks to Dominic Wilcox for challenging us to reinvent normal.

Thanks to Katherine Williams for sharing the video about Dominic.

Thanks to Twitter for connecting people’s minds.

Redefining collaboration with the PYP Exhibition

Unfortunately, I think that the idea of collaboration is very rarely understood properly by teachers of the PYP. For many of us, student collaboration has always meant “working in a group” and never really progressed any further than that. Part of the problem with this is our misguided belief that teacher collaboration means “planning in a group”, but more on that another time.

Ironically, it is our flagship student experience – the PYP Exhibition – that can be held responsible for our misconceptions about collaboration. It was always designed to be a “collaborative inquiry ” and so, to that end, teachers have been popping their poor students into groups in PYP schools worldwide every year. Doesn’t sound so bad, does it? Well, yes, its catastrophic for many of the following types of student:

  • those students who end up being put in a group because there wasn’t a group based on their interest
  • those students who end up being put in a group because the group they wanted to be in was “full”
  • those students who always end up doing all the work in groups
  • those students who always fade into the background while others take the glory
  • those students who have always let others do the work because they lack confidence or skills
  • those students whose interests and styles of learning are never quite the same enough for them to be in a group
  • those students who make misguided group choices and regret it later
  • those students who compromise their own identity just to be in a group
  • introverts
  • extroverts
  • outliers
  • etc… have I left anyone out?

When teachers create a finite amount of groups for the PYP Exhibition (often defined by a finite number of pre-determined things the kids can learn about) with a finite number of places in each group they are undermining inquiry from the word “go”. They are also pushing cooperation and not setting the scene for genuine collaboration to happen naturally. They are creating the conditions for conflict, frustration, bickering, divisive behaviour, sulking and competitiveness. We have all seen it.

When you remove this obsession with grouping from the equation completely and allow students to develop their own inquiries… a real, natural, diverse, dynamic and unpredictable culture of collaboration begins to evolve:

  • you get partnerships and groups emerging at different times in the process based on a recognition of like minds or similar goals
  • you get frequent, spontaneous collaborations taking place as students share information, exchange ideas or help each other with things
  • you get collaborations happening between students and adults as teachers, parents and other members of the community get involved in the process
  • you get collaborations between the students and students of all other ages who become part of the process
  • you get collaboration happening by email, and online
  • you get collaboration you never anticipated

Putting students (and all people) in groups and calling it collaboration is a mould that must be broken. We have been breaking that mould for a while now, and it works.

Why not give it a try? There’s no need to wait for the PYP Exhibition, after all… it’s just another unit of inquiry.

Ideas People vs. Finger Pointers: If only it wasn’t like that.

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Myself and Chad are on our way to Phuket to spend a week at the wonderful, small, new school called The Gecko School. This is a cool story in itself, and one I will tell in subsequent postings this week.

However, I am going to look backwards first, to my time working in the city I sit in now – Bangkok – en route to Phuket.

I was here last week too, and bumped into a couple of ex-colleagues as I wandered around the city I both love and hate. We sat for a few minutes and analyzed the strange culture of one of my former schools – a place where innovative and “different” teachers tend to struggle. One of them casually came out with a statement about teachers who don’t share their ideas and try and glorify themselves by keeping hold of them and being secretive about how they teach. I nodded without really considering what was said. I only really thought about it afterwards, and it annoyed me because I was pretty sure it was a thinly veiled dig at me!

It is in the nature of ideas that sometimes they work and sometimes they don’t. It is also in the nature of ideas that they are spontaneous and organic. Very often, one is not aware of how good an idea actually is until its happening! A strong teaching team is aware of what each other is doing in their classrooms. Student learning is public. Doors are open. Chats about learning are frequent, formal and informal. When you see something working in another classroom, your curiosity is piqued… you ask the students and teacher what they are doing, why they are doing it and how. You may ask the teacher to come and run a session in your class – or, even better, some students. Or you may just pop back, take a few photos and consider how, or even if, to adapt it to the way your own students and classroom culture operates.

It is not a problem caused by “Ideas People” not sharing their ideas. It is a problem of the people who have the ideas sharing them and sharing them and sharing them and sharing them and ending up being stigmatized because of their ideas. Having other people not think their ideas were valid, worthwhile, important, meaningful, realistic… but then when they see those ideas come to fruition, when they see those ideas become powerful, when they see a transformation in those students because of those ideas – that is when they announce that ideas were not shared. That is when the envy kicks in, that’s when it all turns around… because there’s no proof. There’s no proof that they didn’t hear that idea, see that idea, chat about that idea… but just didn’t think it was a good idea.

But there is proof that they didn’t do it. And there is proof that the teacher who did do it, did do it! And there is proof that their students’ learning was transformed because of it.

Sadly, in some schools, that is proof enough to damage a great teacher, to render one guilty of not being a “team player”. I am not sure that many people in schools have a very sophisticated understanding of what a team really is.

  • So, if you are one of those “Ideas People”, be strong. Let your practice do the talking. People who are genuinely interested will show their interest in positive ways – make them welcome. They will be important allies when times get tough.
  • And, if you are one of those people who keeps pointing your finger at “Ideas People” and copping out by saying they are not a team player, look to yourself first… that may well be the root of the problem.

Creating space for, and in, the learning

I recorded this bit of audio to try and remember my thoughts as I reflected on watching my kids play this weekend. I did start typing it up, but the more I listened to the recording, the more I realized it would just be better to upload it to Soundcloud and share it that way!!!

How do you create space for, and in, the learning?

Curiosity

Curiosity

I asked teachers to list which qualities were most important without giving them a list to choose from, almost none mentioned curiosity. Many teachers endorse curiosity when they’re asked about it, but it isn’t uppermost on their minds – or shaping teaching and learning.

Why is this disturbing?

Because research shows unequivocally that when people are curious about something, they learn more, and better.

Given that curiosity has such a positive impact on learning, you might assume that teachers are doing everything they can to encourage it. But that’s not the case. Think about how you approach teaching. Do you give time for students to be curious, naturally curious about things that interest them? Or are you just trying to get through it all and tick the boxes? Do you allow your students space to be curious?

See things through their eyes…

As I walked to the gate to get on my plane back to Bangkok, from Phuket, departing passengers merged with arriving passengers just for a moment. A flight had come in from Russia and the flow of passengers was being blocked by a little boy, possibly four years old, who had stopped to look out of the window. Just across the tarmac of the runway was the clear blue sea of Phuket and he was gawping at it, shouting excitedly at his parents in Russian. Perhaps, and I know this is an assumption, this was the first time he had seen the sea, or at least a sea that looked like that!

Naturally, this got me thinking.

I wonder if, as adults in our capacity as teachers or parents, we sometimes forget about that emotional response to seeing, hearing, feeling, tasting, sensing, knowing, making or understanding something for the first time.  Are we sometimes guilty of missing that crucial moment of learning because we have become accustomed, blasé, jaded, cynical or ambivalent about the world around us? Does this mean that we become less able to teach or less able to bring up our children in ways that do connect with their emotions? Are we, dare I say it, too caught up in our own emotional web that we forget what naivety and real “finding out” feel like, not just for children but also for ourselves?

I hope not. This emotional response, I believe, is actually the essence of curiosity. Curiosity can, but doesn’t always have to, convert itself into inquiry.

So, I guess what I’m saying is… parents, teachers, anybody with a part to play in the growth of children, try to remind yourself to see things through their eyes. Try to reconnect yourself with those emotional responses . Try to live in a way that gives you those emotional responses too – travel, seek change, be mindful, look closely at the world around you, try new things, have a go, be open to people. Then, I am sure, we can all play our part as well as we are meant to.

I have to thank Louie Schwartzberg and TED for the video below. I wonder if, had I not watched this video , if I would even have seen and watched the little Russian boy at all: