Tagged: practice

Learning From Our Students

reflection

Teachers do a lot of reflecting, but do we ever truly reflect?

The type of reflection I’m referring to is the type that drills down to the core and demands to explore and examine the inner workings of who we are, how best we teach and why things worked out the way they did in our practice, style and approach.

Do  you venture outside of yourself and look to blame others when things didn’t work out or do you look within and accept the home truths that laid buried beneath the surface?

Who are you? What is your tendency?

As teachers, we expect our students to reflect all the time. “What could you do differently next time?” or “Write a piece on what you now know and understand because of this experience.”

Do we leave enough room for teachers to do the same? I’m leaning towards a ‘no’ here.

I guess this is where I have a problem with it all. We get our students to reflect, yet teachers are the worst at it. Yes, there are those 6 times in the year we skim over the reflection piece of a planner – agreed. But, it is more about getting through it, as opposed to that true excavation of how to be better, increase intrigue and insight for the next opportunity to improve. I believe that there needs to be a section (time allowed) where students give feedback to teachers on how we could have taught them better. Imagine that! An opportunity for us to learn from our students and see things through the eyes of a 6 or 10 year-old.

We would discover things about ourselves that we would normally ‘overlook’  and, therefore would ‘look over’ to seek ways to simplify, improve and learn from.

Give students a voice to build a real culture of honesty – that will lead us towards being and doing better for them and for ourselves too.

I also believe that (now I’m taking a side Sam) teachers need to not only reflect about the pedagogy, they also need to reflect about what they bring and don’t bring to each unit – not just as a teacher, but as a person. We are great at using terms like growth mindset and innovation for education, redefining, being a capacity builder…. what does all that mean if we leave out the biggest piece – how is your practice changing you?

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First Round of Drop-in Visits

I went for my first round of drop-ins to people’s classrooms today. I had emailed beforehand and said that I was going to come by as many rooms as I could in order to:

  • Start getting a sense of what is happening in all the classrooms in the Elementary School
  • Get a good relationship going with all of you that is non-confrontational, collegial and spontaneous
  • Get a big picture understanding of beliefs and practices in Language Arts

The experience was really positive and really confirmed how powerful it is to go and see what other teachers are doing. I came away with a much better understanding of what my colleagues are doing and several ideas that I’d like to start putting into practice in my own classroom. It would be wonderful if every teacher did a quick walk-around in one of their free periods each month, for example.

I’m going to do a separate posting for a number of things that I saw so that people can make specific comments.