Isn’t it ironic… don’t you think.

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“When that is out of the way.”

“Once we get through it.”

“It will soon be over.”

“When it’s done we can then get back on track.”

How many times do we hear these statements in schools. Wishing to be doing something else. Galloping along to get to something else, even if we don’t know what that something else is. We all know in schools there is something to be done. We are always doing things, most of the time without knowing the purpose or meaning of it.

As we all know, accreditation is a big deal and we do know the meaning and purpose of it. Being authorized means you are a good school, doing good things and it’s a good place to work and learn – essentially, that is what it all comes down to in its simplest terms.

A self-study is an opportunity to take a look at the school you teach at and students learn in.  A school should invest about 12 months in the Self-study process. That’s plenty of time to collect evidence, look at the previous evaluation report, make some self-study groups, make judgments against the standards and practices, write a summary and go through a team visit. This is an opportunity to learn more about what you do well, where the holes are and find ways to plug those holes to be an even better place for parents, teachers and students. The self-study is a time to celebrate, keep schools accountable and  mostly focus on Section C (2,3,4) – the quality of teaching and learning and how people work together towards a common goal.

This is the right time to now introduce the word irony in this situation. If a Self-study is meant to be an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of how far you’ve come, why does it bring so much displeasure and angst?

We have dedicated and committed teachers doing their best to put a robust, detailed and accurate Self-study report together… yet I have to say, I’ve caught myself saying the above statements. I should be fist pumping teachers in the corridor and giving high fives for the work we’ve done. The reality is we are tired. After a good day of teaching and learning, getting up in front of the staff and saying those words Self-study, just sucks the enthusiasm out of the room. But, this is important and we have to do it. The Self-study is mostly about collaboration, teaching and learning. This is the business we are in. This is what we offer.  I find this incredibly ironic and vexing.

Half of me feels like I am going to get a rap over the knuckles for sharing this much with you.

Am I saying what everyone else is thinking and feeling, or is it just me?

Maybe I am suffering from Self-study fatigue….

The PYP and the “genie in a bottle”

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A parent recently asked me if I felt her children would struggle when returning to a more conservative model of education after several years in a PYP school… and an innovative PYP school at that.

She was mainly thinking about whether or not they would have fallen behind academically in the traditional subject areas as the system in her country, like in most of them, is very content-specific. I said that they may find there are things that they haven’t learned… of course! However, I told her, after several years in the PYP they will have the ability to access that information as they will be skilled in the “art of learning”. I reassured her that what they have learned, or haven’t learned, should not present them with insurmountable problems.

What they might struggle with, I said, is being expected to go backwards in terms of how they learn. Being put back into a traditional classroom set-up in which all students sit at tables all day, sometimes in rows. Being put back into a traditional teacher-student authority relationship. Being put back into situations where all students are doing the same thing, the same way at the same time. Being put back into didactic, predetermined contexts for learning. Being put back into a place where only a few forms of expression are valued. These are all things they might struggle with. These are all things that many children who leave PYP schools and go back to state systems struggle with.

The metaphor of a genie in a bottle sprung to mind as I was talking. We laughed about how the PYP has released the inner genie in her children, and children like them, and how it might be very difficult or even impossible to put the genie back into the bottle!

But, do we really want to?

Header image from here

 

Creating the need or desire to make

There’s a lot of hype around “makerspaces” at the moment – I definitely wish I’d bought shares in Lego a couple of years ago! It’s great though, our schools are responding to the need for students to work with their hands, to think differently and to learn to become content or product creators.

One thing we have to be very careful of, however, is that theses places – and what happens inside them – don’t become another separate entity, another “subject” or another thing that happens outside of “regular learning” or “the real stuff”. Know what I mean?

These spaces – and what happens inside them – need to become natural extensions of all the other types of learning that happen in our schools. All of that learning needs to create opportunities for students to make. Students need to become more and more aware of what is possible and then they need to be connected with the people, places and materials that can make those possibilities become reality.

True change happens when making becomes a mindset in the school, not a subject. If the mindset doesn’t evolve, makerspaces may end up being another fad.

 

Teacher Profile

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Forget the learner profile for a second…. what about the Teacher Profile!

The other day I was sitting in a meeting with the MYP and DP coordinator and we asked ourselves what type of teacher do we want here?

THE TEACHER PROFILE

This could be different and unique for every school depending on their culture and what is needed at that point of time to move the school forward; therefore, it could evolve and change.

After discussing, debating and really thinking about it… we all agreed on one – OPTIMISM.

If one exhibits continual optimism then so many other things shine through. Looking at everything as an ‘opportunity’ can only mean that true growth and movement for change will follow.

Adaptable was second on our list….. we didn’t get any further than that in deciding from the 12 we had on our list.

What would make your list? (Let’s say top 3)

What type of person do you want to be around and how would that bring about achieving a desirable and measurable impact to develop a school’s identity?

Educational Malpractice

If the 20th century was about rows, the 21st century should be about circles.

There is an ever-increasing voice for real change to challenge education. The above video touched on a plethora of points, which we actually all know about – or at the very least – should know about.

What is it going to take to do something tangible about turning education on its head completely, as a whole, and not its individual parts?

There are some great teachers out there who really do care and are trying to challenge ideals, approaches and attitudes. It isn’t enough. The amount of tweets I read, and the workshops and the conference people attend for the most part have the same recurring theme:

Challenge, Inspire, Re-imagine, Redefine, Innovate, 21st Century Education and on and on.

We get it…. education needs to change. The world is always changing and education hasn’t really changed that much in a very, very long time. Yes, there is technology and we have fancy spaces, yet I don’t feel that things have changed a great deal.

Where to from here?

I actually don’t think we know how to change, and that change is so slow some of us are beginning to feel like nothing is ever going to change. While this may be coming off in a cynical and defeatist way, I am feeling like this more and more.

The above video could lead us down many different paths…. Let’s take one of those that recently happened.

The other day, as a Primary staff we were talking about abolishing report cards.  We use Seesaw (Student Driven Digital Portfolio) as a way to capture and record evidence of learning and thinking. We have 4 Open Houses a year at the end of a unit of inquiry for parents to see what students are up to. We have 1 three-way conference, 1 Student-led Conference and 1 formal teacher-parent meeting a year. Plus, on top of that we report 6 times a year and parents can arrange a meeting at any point throughout the year to discuss their child’s progress. That is a lot of contact and opportunities to partner and connect with parents, teachers and students. So let’s get rid of written reports.

Cons

  • They take weeks to gather evidence, write, proofread and organize etc.;
  • They take away from more important things such as planning, being prepared for lessons and teaching and learning;
  • Reporting time causes a decay in one’s well-being, anxiety and stress;
  • Often students miss out because teachers have an already difficult time keeping their heads above water.
  • Some parents don’t read them fully or at all;
  • And the kicker that stands true for most…. teachers just trawl through previous year’s comments, use them, modify them and often say, well those two students are the same anyway. Admit it. Again, the quality of the report doesn’t say that much.

Pros

  • It is a formalized way to assess a student’s progress.

I often hear that we write reports because so that when they ‘leave’ our school the next school needs a record for admissions and to help place them. Really… that’s not good enough.

Admissions already (and this is increasing) send their own school’s profile to a student’s current teacher to get a picture of a student’s abilities, talents, personality and academic prowess or learning challenges. Let’s just use that… in the place of reports. That would mean teachers can do that requirement really well and depending on the school would be about 3-5 of those per class, per year. That’s manageable. Let’s put the focus on quality of teaching and learning…. not, “I am so busy!” We could say that every day – we’re teachers. But it’s best to be ‘busy’ on the things that matter. Reporting time is stressful for everyone. Where are the brave educators gone?

This is the difference between radical and progressive thinking and ideas to make the bold changes needed and a school actually standing up in the name of ‘making circles and not rows.’ Be that first school to say “we believe that what we do is more than enough to communicate to parents who their child is as a person and a learner and we do not value formal report cards”.

More schools will follow that bold school which takes a stand – they will.

Who’s first? (Give me two years to change hearts and minds)

Ideas more important than ego

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My wife came home today and talked about how great it had been working with one of our colleagues on something. The way she talked about it really synthesized many of the things I have been wondering about recently, particularly with regard to planning, collaboration and why (or why not) people are able to do it well.

She talked about how the generation of ideas had been centre-stage and that this person had been able, so quickly and naturally, to adjust her initial ideas based on new information that led to inevitable change. Rather than be upset about it, take it personally or complain about this new information and the reasons behind it… she just adapted.

This is a great example of the ideas being much more important than the ego. This is something that is inherent in good teachers. They love to discuss ideas, to share them, to develop them, to change them, to play with them and even to return to the original ones! They know that these processes are vital as teachers struggle with the complexities and challenges of making things as purposeful as possible. They know that their part in this process is important, valuable and worthy of their time.

Most importantly, they know that the process exercises their brain, expands their thinking, keeps them fresh, challenges their intellect and helps them make connections with other people.

They know they’re learning.

Critical in all of this, also, is the understanding that we shouldn’t fear our own ideas, we shouldn’t fear “being wrong”and we shouldn’t be annoyed by the refining of our ideas by other people – that’s the exciting part! As educators, we try to guide students towards being able to exchange ideas without an adversarial approach – “I’m right… you’re wrong” – but so often get caught in that petty, dichotomous behaviour ourselves.

Take a look around you when you’re next at school. Look out for the people who…

  • just come out with their ideas without second-guessing themselves or other people’s interpretation
  • love to listen to other people’s ideas just as much as they love to say their own
  • visibly learn and grow as ideas are shared
  • refer to other people’s ideas
  • have a sense of excitement, freedom and chattiness about ideas
  • discuss ideas socially as well as professionally
  • understand that ideas are not about knowing everything
  • know that the discussion of ideas is time well spent
  • understand that ideas are not responsible for the people who thought of them!

… and let them know you appreciate them.

By contrast, but equally important, keep your eye out for the “Idea Killers”! (see the fantastic list of 16 ways people kill ideas in this posting, from which I also got the header image for my posting)

Using music to create mood

Playing different types of music in order to create certain moods has always been a large part of my practice. Of course, sometimes no music is required. However, at other times, the right piece of music can create the atmosphere that is needed in order to stimulate student thinking, creativity, calm or energy.

The piece of music above is one of many that I have used when I want my students to feel calm, at ease and able to express themselves, either verbally or visually. If you just hit play on this video, it is followed by lots of other cool music too (I just found that out!).

I will try and remember to share more thoughts about the use of music in classrooms, and to share some of the pieces of music that I have found particularly effective for different purposes.

How do you use music in your practice?