Category: Mindfulness

Quieten the noise, and get focused! Life Coaching by Kavita Satwalekar

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In today’s world of multi-tasking – managing work, your family, your home, social media, etc… Life has become ever so complicated!

There isn’t a single moment of “quiet time” that we can afford for ourselves during the day, week, or sometimes even in a month. Life just goes by, with us spinning in place, putting out fires and living everywhere but in the moment. In order to get focused and move forward, we need to quieten the noise!

How do you quieten the noise and get focused?

Step 1: Reflect on the following questions

  • What are your top 3 priorities?
  • What are your top 3 distractions?

Step 2: Note down & pay attention to the following

  • Do you multi-task?
  • If you answered ‘yes’ to the previous question, does that truly
    make you more productive?
  • Pay attention to where you can say ‘no’ more often. Saying ‘yes’ to too many people or things often means saying ‘no’ to something in your own life.
  • Understand what boosts your focus and use it when needed.
  • Pay attention to when and where you can do a little extra to finish off something important.

Step 3: Outline your plan in small, achievable and measurable
steps

  • Devise a plan to consciously block your distractions for chunks of time during the day.
  • Focus on your priorities and ensure everything you do, every single day, is moving you a step closer towards achieving them.
  • Start with a one-week plan, follow through on it and assess your success on the weekend.

Step 4: Start working towards the new YOU

Are you ready to take action and make changes in your environment, habits and life? If yes, make a note of 3 actions to create more focus in your life.

Knowing about your strengths and weak links – and consciously working with them – can put you way ahead of yourself. If you find yourself wanting to learn more about the cluster of emotions and experiences you’ve become, please do reach out to me and I can conduct online life-coaching sessions with you. I can be reached via email at kavita@innersensecoaching.com, through my website at
www.innersensecoaching.com, or via LinkedIn or Facebook.

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“Do you know your weak link(s)?” Life Coaching by Kavita Satwalekar

chain-2027199_1280Do you know your weak link/(s)?

All of us have weak links in our lives. For some of us it’s the things
we do to sabotage ourselves. Do you know what you do to
sabotage yourself?

How do you sabotage yourself?

Step 1: Reflect on your life

Think through all the times you have led your life as you desire. Now
think through all the times you haven’t.

Step 2: Note down any patterns in your behavior

  • Was there a similarity in the way events played out?
  • What was the difference between successful and unsuccessful
    events?
  • What patterns did you notice in the events that weren’t a
    success?
  • Did you knowingly or unknowingly sabotage yourself?

Step 3: Outline your plan in small, achievable and measurable
steps

  • How can you anticipate patterns in your life?
  • How can you intercept those patterns and use them to your
    advantage?

Step 4: Start working towards the new YOU

  • Create an achievable plan and start working towards it.
  • Now that you’re starting to be more aware of yourself, how can
    you continue to help yourself?

Knowing about your strengths & weak links, and consciously working
with them, can put you way ahead of yourself. If you find yourself
wanting to learn more about the cluster of emotions and experiences
you’ve become, please do reach out to me and I can conduct online
life-coaching sessions with you. I can be reached via email at
kavita@innersensecoaching.com, through my website at
www.innersensecoaching.com, or via LinkedIn or Facebook.

 

Talking at students instead of with students

Having the privileged of being in a number of schools and classrooms provides a lot of insight into the teacher personality and how teachers teach. For whatever reason we assume that talking ‘at’ students means they are listening and learning. Research shows that this could not be further from the truth. We need to be mindful of how much we talk ‘at’ students. One person in the room should not be doing all the thinking and talking. It is our responsibility to set the scene for learning, provide a stimulating experience and allow students to lead the conversation and thinking. And if we’re doing our jobs properly, we are capturing and connecting the ideas and thinking swirling around.

We have put this to the test and have had teachers use a timer to measure the time spent talking. This has made teachers consider the talk time when coming together.

Let’s consider a few things first:

  • Not every adult in the room has to speak to validate why they are there (if you’re in a co-teaching situation);
  • Say what you need to and let students get on with it;
  • Use a visual so students can clearly see what you mean;
  • Be clear about the learning focus and purpose;
  • If there are clarifying questions, let the students go and address the questions in the mean time.

All pretty obvious things, right?!

Talking for 30-40, hey even 20 minutes while students are on the carpet/desks is a real time waster. There is no better way to turn their enthusiasm for learning off. A lot of those behaviour problems will disappear if we engaged our students more and let them drive their learning. We need to give them the time to do that though.

This is where the speaking ‘with’ students comes in. A wise teacher will set the learning, work the room and have conversations with their students. What an opportunity to learn more about what they are thinking while creating excitement and energy for active learning.

While I understand how simple this reminder is, we need to be mindful of the time we use when setting the learning up for our students.

Have a solid structure in place that allows learning to be more fluid so it can flow. Develop clear systems and expectations that in turn create a culture of empowered learners. This will build more independence with our students. Invite students to take authentic action by giving them time so that they have an opportunity to lead their own learning. This requires a lot of trust. Let them go!

Aim for 10 minutes, say what needs to be said and then hand it over to them. Simple!

 

 

Designing powerful learning experiences

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Once teachers have a good sense of the “big picture” of units, they turn their attention to designing the initial learning experience, or provocation, for their students. Not much more than this should be planned as everything else really depends on how students respond to this initial experience.

When designing powerful learning experiences, it is important to consider these points:

Check teacher attitudes – all teachers involved need to be genuinely curious about their students and how they will react or respond to learning experiences and see themselves as inquirers who are researching their students.

Return to learning – continuously remind yourselves of the desired learning in the unit and also be aware of any other learning that may unexpectedly become part of it.

Know your curriculum – familiarity with the curriculum – basically “knowing it like the back of your hand” – means you can plan for learning and also include unexpected learning as it arises.

Understand difficulty and create struggle – students will only really reveal useful information about themselves to you if there is an element of challenge  or struggle involved. This is what separates a provocative learning experience from an “activity”.

Consider group dynamics – be very purposeful about how you intend your students to work… are you looking for them to think independently or to collaborate? Are their choices about how to work part of the information you’re looking for?

Collaborate for effectiveness – work well with your colleagues to make sure each of you has an active role during the experience, such as observing and documenting in different ways.

Test on yourselves – it’s always a good idea, as well as fascinating, for teachers to try out a learning experience on themselves to see how it feels, what is revealed and whether or not it is really worth doing.

Use pace, place and space – these three elements are often overlooked, yet can totally make or break learning experiences. Think carefully about how time will be used and how you can read the situation to add or take away time accordingly. Think carefully about the best location for learning experiences to take place and how that location could be adapted for the purpose. Explore the space and discuss how you can use space intentionally, including the movement of students and the placement of materials, to create the right feeling and atmosphere.

Understand the power of mood – explore ideas and strategies for the creation of particular moods to enhance learning, such as relaxation, mindfulness and music (I’ll write a posting about this soon). Most importantly of all, have high expectations for student attitude and let them know you care about it and take it seriously.

 

Planning: the difference between easiness and flow

For teachers, planning should never really be easy. It should be mentally taxing. It should be intellectually grueling. It should challenge group dynamics. It should cause tension and emotional responses. Our students – and, more importantly, the future of our world – deserve that this is so.

Sometimes, though, planning can feel easy. A combination of any of the following factors, or energies, can cause this to happen:

  • teachers may be extremely interested or motivated by the subject matter
  • there may be a serendipitous combination of ideas
  • there may be a synergy of personalities
  • the context may be almost perfectly timely

Rest assured though, it may feel easy, but it actually isn’t. You see, creating the conditions for any combination of these things to occur, recognizing that they are occurring or making the most of the fact that they are occurring all require thought. They require intellect and they require people with minds wide open enough to harness them, to run with them and to allow them to flow.

That is not easy.

Confusing confidence with a “big ego”

 

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The word “ego” often comes up in conversations about teachers, and not in a positive sense.

We hear teachers being described as having a “big ego”. However, this is usually in reference to teachers who are confident. This confidence comes through by:

  • consistently putting ideas on the table
  • coming up with an approach and going for it
  • refusing to allow oneself to be bullied
  • projecting an image of confidence to students
  • looking confident
  • taking on the challenge of leading people
  • stepping up to deal with situations
  • consistently contributing to discussions in large groups

Sure, these can sometimes spill over into arrogance or an inflated ego, but usually only when people feel cornered, subject to critical scrutiny by colleagues or – inevitably – malicious gossip.

I think a teacher ego – in it’s negative sense – is much less visible than the things in the list above. I think a negative teacher ego manifests itself as:

  • believing one is much better at one’s job than one is
  • claiming good practice is obvious, yet not actually doing it
  • being a know-it-all
  • always referring to one’s own ideas, thoughts and practices and not those of other people
  • making it clear that other people’s perspectives matter less than one’s own, either consciously or subconsciously
  • consistently talking while other people are talking
  • finishing other people’s sentences
  • shutting people down
  • consistently judging other people’s practice and behaviour
  • believing other people are interested in one’s negative or critical thoughts
  • struggling to see anything from other people’s perspectives
  • consistently making everything about oneself
  • making one’s problems someone else’s problems

These behaviours are subtle, divisive and destructive… and particularly so because they are not usually the behaviours of people who are often described as “having a big ego”. Instead, they are often the behaviours of people who come across as insecure and, as a result, are quite hidden.

I should clarify that I’m not writing this posting because of anything that has happened to me recently… some, but not all, of my postings are autobiographical! I guess I’m writing this posting because I would like to see an increasingly sophisticated understanding of:

  • what confidence is and why it is important for young people to be taught by confident adults
  • how to avoid writing off confident people as having a “big ego” and preventing that initial observation from manifesting itself as malicious gossip
  • how to deal with the more subtle, egotistical behaviours that do more harm in our schools than any confident, or even over-confident, behaviours could ever do

 

image from https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/positive-ego-nancy-steidl-1

 

 

Redefining School: A School That Takes Sides

 

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One thing that bothers me about international schools is the fear of taking a strong stance on any sort of issues. We persistently flap about in the no-man’s land of opinion, belief and – most worryingly – ethics. We have wonderful mission statements, visions, learner profiles, principles, codes of conduct etc… ad infinitum… but we don’t take a stance on anything that really matters.

Imagine working at a school that explicitly took sides against one, a few or all of these things that exist outside and/or inside the walls of most of our schools:

  • corruption
  • consumerism
  • massive gaps between the rich and the poor
  • environmental destruction
  • waste and the production of rubbish
  • racism
  • maltreatment of refugees

Imagine a school that refused to accept the children of parents who were in the country for dubious or destructive purposes – industries that caused pollution of the destruction of the environment, for example. Or a school that refused to accept the children of powerful local “dignitaries” or owners of the construction companies that are turning many of the cities we work in into nightmarish visions of “progress”. Or a school that refused to accept the citizens of countries waging wars on foreign soil. Or a school that insisted on paying its local staff decent wages. Or a school that would not tolerate seeing people living in distressing circumstances within a certain radius of its premises. Or a school that gave disadvantaged local people scholarships or new career opportunities.

Or, basically, a school that does more good than harm… and is fiercely proud of that fact. Is that how we can make sure our schools are “human”?